Heather J. Lynch, Ron Naveen, and Paula Casanovas. 2013. Antarctic Site Inventory breeding bird survey data, 19942013. Ecology 94:2653. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-1108.1


Data Paper

Ecological Archives E094-243-D1.

Copyright


Authors
Data Files
Abstract
Metadata


Author(s)

Heather J. Lynch
Department of Ecology & Evolution
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook, New York 11794 USA
E-mail: heather.lynch@stonybrook.edu

Ron Naveen
Oceanites, Inc.
P. O. Box 15259, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20825 USA

Paula Casanovas
Department of Biology
College of Computer, Mathematics and Natural Sciences
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4415 USA


Data Files

Antarctic_Site_Inventory_census_data_1994_2012.csv (MD5: 00871bd47b6ec30cda68d1506120bfb3)


Abstract

This data set represents the accumulation of 19 years of seabird population abundance data collected by the Antarctic Site Inventory, an opportunistic vessel-based monitoring program surveying the Antarctic Peninsula and associated sub-Antarctic Islands. This data paper, which include 1124 records from 113 locations for seven species of seabirds (Adélie Penguin [Pygoscelis adeliae], Gentoo Penguin [P. papua], Chinstrap Penguin [P. antarctica], Macaroni Penguin [Eudyptes chrysolophus], Blue-eyed Shag [Phalacrocorax atriceps], Kelp Gull [Larus dominicanus], and Southern Giant Petrel [Macronectes giganteus]) includes data already published by the Antarctic Site Inventory as well as seven years of recent data not previous published. Census data represent a mix of nest and chick counts; each census record includes the location, date, and precision of the census count, along with any auxiliary notes. Included with the database are maps to clarify the location of specific breeding populations that may be new (and thus not previous reported) or ambiguous. This compilation represents the best single source of raw data on the spatiotemporal dynamics of the Pygoscelis penguins in the Antarctic Peninsula region, and provides population data on several flying bird species less frequently studied.

Key words: Adélie penguin; Antarctic Peninsula; Blue-eyed Shag; breeding bird survey; Chinstrap Penguin; Gentoo Penguin; Macaroni Penguin; Pygoscelis; Southern Giant Petrel; vessel-based monitoring.